3 Reasons to Join the PBC Enduro

Every Saturday starting in January, we’ll be running our famous Enduro program (now called the PBC Enduro). We’ll start out short and sweet and gradually build you up to FOUR hours of riding! In our renovated spin studio, surrounded by other cyclists, great music, and an engaging instructor, the time flies by! Your legs will thank you come spring when you hit the pavement!

Here are three reasons we Love The PBC Enduro…

Winter Is All About The Base

Winter is for laying down those endurance base miles. Long low intensity riding is the foundation needed to build power, speed, and strength on the bike.  Every part of your cycling fitness is built upon a solid base of endurance fitness. You can’t go hard until you’ve learned how to go long. And endurance riding is one of the best ways to improve your body’s ability to metabolize and break down fat. You don’t burn as many calories doing low intensity efforts, but you know that every calorie you do burn is coming straight from your fat stores!

Motivation and Social Interaction

The dreary days of January and February are tough on everyone. It’s dark in the evenings, it’s cold. And it can be very lonely! Every Saturday you can pop by the shop, grab a coffee and chat with Leah at Little Victories before jumping on the bike with 20 other people for a great ride. The great part about low intensity base miles is you can still talk and interact! It’s not just a workout, its a great way to catch up and shoot the breeze!

Sure we can get on the trainer and Zwift, but how many laps of Watopia can you do in your basement before you get bored? And what if it’s a Richmond Day? We shudder at the thought!

Get out of the pain cave and get a great ride in with great people, great coffee, and great music!

Join the PBC Ride in Spring!

You’ve spent all winter riding with us in the RideINSIDE studio, put that fitness to good use and join the Cyclelogik PBC Ride on Saturday mornings! Two groups hit the road in the morning. The first is a controlled no drop ride perfect for riders of all abilities (though after a winter in the Enduro class, you’ll be fine!) and the second is the A ride, a full out hammerfest! Take those base miles into summer and out onto the road!

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6 Tips for Getting the Most From RideINSIDE

Our RideINSIDE classes are designed using the same training principles that coaches use to build workouts that improve performance for cycling and triathlon disciplines! There’s a lot that goes into the RideINSIDE program. But what you get out of the class is still largely up to you! Following the cues and working at the prescribed effort is just part of the equation. Up your game by following these 6 tips!

Improve Your Core Strength!

Cycling is all about having a strong and stable core. A weak core means you need to spend extra energy that could be driving the pedals around on stabilizing your body on the bike. Once a day in the morning, before bed, or at lunch (whenever you have 10-15 minutes of free time) do a short core workout. It doesn’t have to be much! Try a plank challenge! Do a one minute plank everyday for a week. Build on that week-to-week until you’re up to four minutes! Incorporate 2-3 set of crunches, with 15-30 reps per set. Or pop by Yogatown on Fridays for their Core Jam yoga!

Relax

Your instructors love looking around the room and seeing all those epic pain faces! It’s how they know you’re working hard! But those pain faces aren’t doing anything to help you turn the pedals. Try to keep your face, shoulders, arms and neck relaxed. In cycling we call it souplesse —the ability to make a hard effort look effortless. All that tensing up is just wasted energy. Make sure you’re not shrugging your shoulders into your neck, that your arms have a slight bend at the elbows, and that your face is relaxed. You can trick your brain into thinking an effort is easier just by trying to give the impression that it is! Fake it ’til you make it!

Pay Attention to Your Form and Body Position

Keep your head up! When we’re working hard we like to look down between our legs. That’s not helping you turn the pedals! Keep your gaze out in front of you. A good general rule is to look out on to the floor 5-6 feet from the front of the bike. Keeping your head, neck, and spine in line not only reduces the chance for stiffness and soreness but it keeps your windpipe open and inline for better breathing.

Take a minute to pay attention to what’s going on with your legs and feet. Are your knees tracking way out? You might need to move your saddle up a little! Are your toes pointed down or are your heels well below your toes at the bottom of the pedal stroke? The former means your saddle might be too high, the latter, too low! What’s happening inside your shoes? Does it feel like your feet are rolling out or in? Is one foot floating inside the shoe? These are all things you want to avoid. A good even pressure on the ball of your foot is key!

Improve your Pedal Stroke and Cadence

Some of our classes incorporate cadence drills to improve technique and pedal stroke but that doesn’t mean you can’t work on it on your own during class! We always recommend a minimum cadence of 90rpm. This alleviates stress on your knees and joints when working at higher wattages. It’s also more efficient! Take a minute to pay attention to your pedal stroke. Are you trying to pedal in perfect circles? Or are you stomping on the pedal?

On the downstroke try to pretend you’re scraping gum off your shoe and avoid pulling up on the pedals. Your foot should never leave the sole of your shoe or feel like it’s floating or pulling on the upper part of your shoe. But you should NOT be stomping either! Think of your pedal stroke like you’re pushing down from 1 O’clock and around to 7-8 O’clock. Let your foot ride the wave from 8 through 12.

Practice Getting Out of the Saddle

Some of our bikes are fixed, meaning you can’t stop pedaling and just coast as you would on your ten speed. These bikes make it easier to stand (and when you’re standing on a fixed, you really get a sense for what we mean when we say ride the wave).

Every now and then jump on a freewheel bike so you can practice freewheel out-of-saddle work. The important part about being out of the saddle is balance. You don’t want your butt way back over the seat nor do you want to be out over your handlebars. Think of the bottom bracket (the pivot point where the pedal arms attach) as your centre of gravity. Stay over top of that with a little bit of weight on the handlebars for balance. Keep elbows tucked and bent slightly. Turning up the resistance also helps you stand on the freewheel bikes but try to avoid adding so much that you’re pedalling through mud!

Stretching and Recovery

You’ll probably find that most of our instructors don’t do post-ride stretching. The primary reason is because there just isn’t enough time to really do a useful and meaningful stretch after a workout. Cycling isn’t a heavy muscular high impact effort like running so there’s not as much tightening and retraction of muscles. It’s best to spend 10-15 minutes (maybe during your core workout!) per day doing some good proper stretching and rolling.

At the end of class, during your cool down, you can aid in recovery by spinning easy but with a higher than normal cadence. This will help prevent seizing and keep your legs feeling loose.

It’s always a good idea to eat after a ride! Even if weight loss is your goal, proper recovery so you don’t feel sluggish throughout the day is important!

Enjoy the Ride!

Ride INSIDE – Improve Your Winter Training!

Winter training is the fundamental building block to a good race season. Without a structured program designed to reinforce your strengths and improve upon your weaknesses, you’ll come into race season feeling unprepared and lacking fitness. For this 2017/2018 we partnered with Human Power Performance to develop an all new Ride INSIDE schedule designed to easily allow athletes to incorporate our classes into their weekly training program.

Each of our classes is designed to address different strengths and weaknesses, different energy systems, and different cycling skills. Let’s take a look at how some of our classes can fit into your winter training plan.

*To see full description of each class, check out the class schedule .

The Inside Ride

Training Focus: Endurance, Aerobic Function, Cadence
Periodization Type: Base
Intensity Level: Low/Moderate

This class is the perfect way to kickstart your winter training cycle. This class covers a wide spectrum of effort levels. If you do only one RideINSIDE class this year, make it this one. It will provide you with a good all-round workout to address various aspects of cycling performance. Throughout your initial base period you should consider incorporating this class into your training at least once or twice a week as you prepare for more race specific performance later in the winter.

Race Pace

Training Focus: VO2 Max, Muscular Force, Climbing Efficiency
Periodization Type: Base/Build
Intensity: Moderate/High

Race Pace is about learning how to perform at higher effort levels and develop fatigue resistance. Muscular force efforts are great for improving climbing ability and maintaining a high level of power through short duration efforts. For  those taking the classic periodization approach, this class ought be incorporated into your training at least once every 3 weeks during the early phases of winter training. As you get closer to spring/race season, consider swapping a low intensity endurance session with one Race Pace class per week. This class is geared toward triathletes looking to improve their climbing ability in Long Course events and overall speed in short course. Cyclists will benefit from the improved climbing power in the 3-5min durations. If you want to nail a Fortune PB, this is the class for you!

Raise the Roof

Training Focus: Threshold Power, Muscular Endurance, Cadence
Periodization Type: Base/Build
Intensity Level: Moderate

Another staple of a good training plan is Sweet Spot and threshold work. This class is designed for both cyclists and triathletes to improve their overall aerobic function. A higher threshold means a faster bike split. This class will not only improve performance in triathlon and cycling event but improve overall fitness ability on the bike. This class is like the The Inside Ride but with more specificity. In the early stages of winter training, consider this class once/week or every other week. As we head into January and February, consider swapping The Inside Ride with this class.

Shut Up Legs

Training Focus: Threshold Power, Muscular Endurance, Cadence
Periodization Type: Base/Build
Intensity Level: Moderate

This is a longer version of Raise the Roof and is great for Long Course triathletes and roadies who want to ride longer and harder. Since this class takes place on Saturday mornings, consider a short brick run after to really get the full benefit for triathlon training. For triathletes going after full distance triathlons, or those who are getting serious about their performance for a Kona qualification or 70.3 AG spot, join us for this class and stay for the PBC endurance ride.

Tuesday Throwdown

Training Focus: High Intensity, Short duration power
Periodization Type: Build/Race
Intensity Level: High

This is a spin-off of our popular Interval Mania class. It incorporates high intensity efforts to improve fatigue resistance, and develop souplesse, or the ability to ride hard with finesse. This class is tough but extremely fun and rewarding. For triathletes this class should be incorporated once per every 4 week cycle to ensure that your anaerobic system is being taxed adequately and to help improve overall aerobic function. For cyclists in the late winter early/spring, consider this class once per week as a great build toward blistering hill attacks and sprints!

Putting It All Together

For those who are self-coached, here some examples of what a week might look like incorporating our RideINSIDE classes:

Long Course Triathlete Base (November – February)

 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday
MorningMasters SwimRun: 30-60min at 10km paceMasters SwimPBC RideEndurance Run 60-120min at Half Marathon Pace
EveningTempo Ride 2x30min at 80% FTPRideINSIDE - Inside RideRecovery Ride
40min at 55-60% FTP
RideINSIDE - Raise the RoofRest Day

Long Course Triathlete Build (February – April)

 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday
MorningMasters SwimRun Speed Work
3min at 800m pace
2min recovery
x4
10min easy
2min at 400m pace
2min easy
x3
Masters SwimShut Up Legs +
Brick Run 20min at 5km pace
Tempo Run Intervals

2x30min at 10km pace
10min recovery between
EveningTempo Ride
90min at 80% FTP
Recovery Ride
40min at 55-60% FTP
RideINSIDE - Race PaceRideINSIDE - Raise the RoofRest Day

Cyclist – Winter Maintenance and Overall Fitness

 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday
MorningRideINSIDE - The Morning HustleRideINSIDE - The Morning HustlePBC Ride
EveningRideINSIDE - Race Pace

Cyclist – Fond, Sportif, Racing, and overall cycling performance

 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday
MorningShut Up Legs30/60/90 Tempo workout
OR
Zwift Race
EveningRecovery Spin
40min 55-60% FTP
RideINSIDE - Tuesday ThrowdownRecovery Spin
40min 55-60% FTP
RideINSIDE - Raise the Roof

 

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#thePBC – Powered by Caffeine Rides

For 2017 we decided to give our classic Saturday morning rides a branding overhaul. What was once referred to as the Cyclelogik A and B rides are now known as The Powered by Caffeine Rides or ‘the PBC’ for short. While the rides themselves haven’t changed much we’ve also added for this year a women’s ride on Tuesday and Saturday mornings.

The PBC A Ride

This ride is for riders who like to go hard and don’t mind being dropped along the way. Riders take turns driving the pace on the front of the group trying to shed their riding partners off their wheel while everyone else tries to hang on.

This ride isn’t a race and there isn’t any attacking from the group but riders are encouraged to set the pace on flats and climbs that may leave their riding partners in the dust. This ride is almost guaranteed to end up splintered in smaller groups. If you find yourself in one of the chase groups, then you know what you have to do: chase!

Because of the nature of the A-ride, it takes more than just good legs, you need to be confident in your bike handling group riding skills to ensure the safety of the group. This isn’t for newbies but you also don’t need to be a pro either. Test your legs against some of Ottawa’s strongest riders.

The PBC B Ride

The B-ride is a controlled pace no drop ride. But that doesn’t mean is a beginner’s ride either. This group can move a long at a good clip and basic group riding skills are necessary. Anyone can join this ride and no will be left behind. So if you want something fun and challenging without the risk of being left out on your own, the B ride is a great choice.

Attacking and hammering the pace on this ride is out of the question. Keep the pace steady and follow the directions of the ride’s leader.

The PBC Women’s Ride

New for 2017, the women’s ride is controlled pace no drop ride, just like the B ride but for women only. This ride is considered an intermediate level ride. You should have some experience group riding and decent level of fitness but you also don’t need to be a bike racer to take part.

If you’re not sure which ride is best for you or whether you have the fitness and skill to participate, give us a call, and we’ll help find a good fit for you.